REGIONAL INTEGRATION SUPPORT PROGRAMME (RISP3)
TERMS OF REFERENCE
CONSULTANCY TO ASSESS THE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COST OF CATTLE RUSTLING IN SUDAN

 CONTEXT AND RATIONALE:

This 3rd Regional Integration Support Programme RISP3 is a follow-up phase to RISP1 (2005-2010) and RISP2 (2010 – 2013). The support will be in line with the EU development policies, as stated in the “European Consensus on Development” (2005), “Agenda for Change” (2011), the EU Aid for Trade Strategy (2007), the Joint Africa-EU Strategy (2007) and its Action Plans, especially their provisions regarding regional integration, world markets and the link between trade and development.

The expected results from the activities carried out over the period covered by this programme estimate are: 

Result 1: Support to transposition of regional dryland agriculture and livestock policies at national level within IGAD region.
Result 2: Support to Institutional strengthening of IGAD Secretariat.

Under result area one, the IGAD Centre for Pastoral Areas and Livestock Development (ICPALD) is planning to assess the social and economic cost of cattle rustling in Uganda, among other interventions.

In the past cattle rustling was a traditional coping mechanism used by pastoralists to restock their herds after natural disasters such as drought and animal diseases or to address shortfalls during traditional and/or marriage ceremonies. However, it has over time evolved into a big criminal commercial enterprise leading to increased incidence of violence, conflicts and loss of lives and livestock. The cyclic conflicts within the IGAD region have fueled this practice through the proliferation of small arms which are now used by the pastoralists as means of protection and even spread over the porous boundaries.

Culturally, men marry with cattle as bride prize, however, young men have been incentivized and encouraged to establish their own herds through raiding from other pastoral groups to meet this traditional need. The involvement of youth in this criminal enterprise and the associated deaths and economic waste is the worst part of this tragedy. The practice is documented to have serious negative impacts of economic growth in the region by engaging youth in destructive activities, destroying productive assets, preventing trade, eroding investor confidence and deterring investment by the private sector.

In Sudan livestock provides livelihoods for more than 20% of the population and remains one of the major resource bases in the country. This mode of livelihood is predominantly pastoral in nature and practiced almost all over the country. Nearly one third to one half of all households reliant upon livestock for their livelihood. Most livestock producers are transhumant or sedentary farmers who maintain herds but also engage in crop production and/or wage labour. However about one third of livestock production comes from two regions, namely Darfur and Kordofan, but other regions like the eastern region (Gedaref and Kassala states), and central region (Sennar, White Nile and Gezira states) are also important and contribute significantly to livestock production and trade in the country. In Sudan there are well established traditional stock routes which have been in use for many years within and across borders with the neighboring countries. These routes have an average width of 100-120 meters and cultivation is not allowed along them. However, some of the routes have been altered due to weal enforcement of the regulatory laws and expansion of farming practices. Hence conflicts between farmers and pastoralists always happen and lead to serious losses. Also livestock rustling is quite normal along these routes and across the borders. Stock theft or cattle rustling is common in Darfur leading to the organization of armed groups in order to return the stolen animals. Banditry especially of camels is common along some trade routes such as those going to Egypt. In eastern Sudan along the borders between Sudan and Ethiopia livestock rustling is also a serious problem, while in the other regions it is practiced but at a lower rate of incidences.

Despite the recent development in security by the government, the practice of cattle rustling continues to take lives of many peoples, undermine livelihoods, negatively affected the level of socio-economic development, and the level of private sector investment.

Cattle rustling  is perceived as a major threat to the cattle economy in the pastoral areas and hence there is an urgent need to assist the government at local and national levels to confront this challenge. However, to deal with a challenge, a complementary integrated approach which encompasses efforts of both state and non-state actors is highly needed. It is important that verifiable data and information on the social economic effects of intervening and not intervening to contain the menace. The proposed study is expected to determine the socio-economic effects of cattle rustling at household, District/State and country levels and inform with  evidence the intended and on-going efforts of curbing the cattle rustling practice and hence reducing the crimes associated with it.

OBJECTIVE OF THE CONSULTANCY
The main objective of this assessment is to derive adequate credible evidence to draw sufficient attention at national policy level to the negative social economic impact of livestock/cattle rustling..  The specific objectives of the study include:-

  • To review the historical context of livestock/cattle rustling and the major factors sustaining the menace.
  • Based on the review above select some hot spots and estimate the social, economic and political costs of livestock/cattle rustling and develop a with and without cattle rustling control scenarios to inform community and policy dialogue while guiding further research and regional planning
  • Propose policy and legal provisions to manage the menace at national and regional levels and link them to the livestock identification and traceability for health and trade
  • To come up with some recommendations and a way forward to help eradicating this practice at household, community and national level.
  • Present the finding for validation by technical teams from IGAD member states at country and regional levels

SPECIFIC TASKS
1. Carry out a desk review to look into the historical and root causes of this phenomenon and help in designing a conceptual framework of analysis for the study
2. Undertake a field survey to collect relevant primary data from relevant stakeholders including pastoralists communities, actors working with them including government, NGOs, and development partners. Other secondary data from the national statistics, and other sources could also be used.
3.Examine and analyze the data and information on its effects on social, economic and political fronts
4.Identify and estimate all direct and indirect social, economic and political costs of livestock/cattle rustling and develop with and without control scenarios
5.Provide policy implications and recommendations for all actors involved in livestock/cattle rustling based on the findings from this study.

PROPOSED METHODOLOGY
To offer good response and insights about livestock/cattle rustling in Sudan, which will guide the other intended regional in-depth study, the methodology of this study will be guided by the following steps:

– Depending on a desk review and secondary forms of data, the study will try to explore the historical context of livestock/cattle rustling and what factors that fuels it. Hot spots near the borders and other levels could also be reviewed.
– The desk review will depend mainly on available published and grey literature and reports from organizations that work on livestock/cattle rustling interventions.
– Depending on primary data, the social, economic and political costs of livestock/cattle rustling will be estimated to justify to what extent that this issue is urgently need viable interventions and mechanisms for its eradication.
– Depending on primary and secondary sources of data the study is expected to estimate the social and economic gains and/or losses to the household
– The sources of primary data will depend on records of live cases of raiding happened during specific period in some selected areas of the country. However, other tools of data collection will be used such as interviews with some government officials form security Departments, key informants interviews, group discussions, observation and other participatory tools

DELIVERABLES
1.An inception report with details on the method and tools to be used and the work plan.
2.Draft report on the assessment of social and economic costs of livestock/cattle rustling in Sudan
3.A comprehensive final report on the assessment of social and economic costs of livestock/cattle rustling in Sudan

DURATION AND CONDITION OF CONSULTANCY
The total duration of the consultancy will be 60 working days, starting from signing the contract by all parties. 

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ICPALD
a) Air tickets and Daily Subsistence Allowance (DSA) will be covered for field work outside the duty station upon approval of travel schedules.
b) Liaison and assistance in communicating with stakeholders.
c) Reports will be submitted to Dr. Osman Babikir, Head, Social Economics and Policy, IGAD Centre for Pastoral Area and Livestock Development (ICPALD) Jadala Place, 1st Floor, Ngong Lane, P. O. Box 47824-00100, Nairobi, Kenya, osman.babikir@igad.int 

CONSULTANT QUALIFICATION AND EXPERTISE
-The successful candidates shall have an advanced degree in livestock economics, animal health and production, conflict and security, agricultural economics or the equivalent
-Knowledge and experience of using participatory approaches
-Strong analytical skills
-Excellent communication/ writing skills and fluency in English 

General professional experience

  • A proven successful track record in livestock economics and/or agricultural economics
  • Proven experience in the required field.
  • Proven knowledge and experience on similar assignments
  • Experience in conducting and facilitating dialogue with national, regional and international organizations

Specific Professional Experience

  • At least 10 years work experience in issues related to the scope of this study
  • Good understanding about livestock related issues and policies
  • Knowledge of how to develop different scenarios of cost benefit analysis
  • Demonstrate competence and skills in analytical analysis
  • Good reporting writing skills.
  • Strong understanding of the local context is an added advantage

APPLICATIONS

Interested candidates should submit their applications accompanied by a detailed CV, copies of both academic and professional certificates and testimonials, names and addresses of three reputable referees, contact details (e-mail, telephone) should be sent by email to: rose.tsuma@igad.int; with copies to, beverlyne.nyanchera@igad.int, and osman.babikir@igad.int

All applications should be received not later than September 8th, 2017

 

REGIONAL INTEGRATION SUPPORT PROGRAMME (RISP3)
TERMS OF REFERENCE
CONSULTANCY TO ASSESS THE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COST OF CATTLE RUSTLING IN KENYA 

CONTEXT AND RATIONALE:

This 3rd Regional Integration Support Programme RISP3 is a follow-up phase to RISP1 (2005-2010) and RISP2 (2010 – 2013). The support will be in line with the EU development policies, as stated in the “European Consensus on Development” (2005), “Agenda for Change” (2011), the EU Aid for Trade Strategy (2007), the Joint Africa-EU Strategy (2007) and its Action Plans, especially their provisions regarding regional integration, world markets and the link between trade and development.
The expected results from the activities carried out over the period covered by this programme estimate are: 

Result 1: Support to transposition of regional dryland agriculture and livestock policies at national level within IGAD region.
Result 2: Support to Institutional strengthening of IGAD Secretariat.

Under result area one, the IGAD Centre for Pastoral Areas and Livestock Development (ICPALD) is planning to assess the social and economic cost of cattle rustling in Uganda, among other interventions.

In the past cattle rustling was a traditional coping mechanism used by pastoralists to restock their herds after natural disasters such as drought and animal diseases or to address shortfalls during traditional and/or marriage ceremonies. However, it has over time evolved into a big criminal commercial enterprise leading to increased incidence of violence, conflicts and loss of lives and livestock. The cyclic conflicts within the IGAD region have fueled this practice through the proliferation of small arms which are now used by the pastoralists as means of protection and even spread over the porous boundaries.

Culturally, men marry with cattle as bride prize, however, young men have been incentivized and encouraged to establish their own herds through raiding from other pastoral groups to meet this traditional need. The involvement of youth in this criminal enterprise and the associated deaths and economic waste is the worst part of this tragedy. The practice is documented to have serious negative impacts of economic growth in the region by engaging youth in destructive activities, destroying productive assets, preventing trade, eroding investor confidence and deterring investment by the private sector.

In Kenya, pastoral communities in arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs) depend on livestock for their livelihood. These ASALs are characterized by temporal and spatial climatic variation, making availability of resources uneven. For efficient use of available resources of water and pasture, mobility is the key strategy practiced by pastoralists. However, this coping strategy has been frequently interrupted by continuous incidents of livestock rustling and raiding. cattle rustling is a forceful acquisition of someone cattle and is quite common amongst the pastoralists of ASALs in Kenya and elsewhere along the globe. It is always accompanied by armed attack and violence. Many researchers highlighted that this practice is a deeply entrenched cultural practice adopted by mainly young men who want to steal livestock for means of re-stocking, or acquiring more heads of cattle for many purposes such as paying of dowry, a show of heroism or a means to wealth enhancement. Now it turned out to be a business or it has been a commercialized activity. It is actually a practice that is responsible from the state of lawlessness, insecurity and grave violations in the ASALs.

Despite the recent development in security by the government, the practice of cattle rustling continues to take lives of many peoples, undermine livelihoods, negatively affected the level of socio-economic development, and the level of private sector investment.

Cattle rustling  is perceived as a major threat to the cattle economy in the pastoral areas and hence there is an urgent need to assist the government at local and national levels to confront this challenge. However, to deal with a challenge, a complementary integrated approach which encompasses efforts of both state and non-state actors is highly needed. It is important that verifiable data and information on the social economic effects of intervening and not intervening to contain the menace. The proposed study is expected to determine the socio-economic effects of cattle rustling at household, District/County and country levels and inform with  evidence the intended and on-going efforts of curbing the cattle rustling practice and hence reducing the crimes associated with it.

OBJECTIVE OF THE CONSULTANCY

The main objective of this assessment is to derive adequate credible evidence to draw sufficient attention at national policy level to the negative social economic impact of livestock/cattle rustling..  The specific objectives of the study are include:-

  • To review the historical context of livestock/cattle rustling and the major factors sustaining the menace.
  • Based on the review above select some hot spots and estimate the social, economic and political costs of livestock/cattle rustling and develop a with and without cattle rustling control scenarios to inform community and policy dialogue while guiding further research and regional planning
  • Propose policy and legal provisions to manage the menace at national and regional levels and link them to the livestock identification and traceability for health and trade
  • To come up with some recommendations and a way forward to help eradicating this practice at household, community and national level.
  • Present the finding for validation by technical teams from IGAD member states at country and regional levels

SPECIFIC TASKS

1. Carry out a desk review to look into the historical and root causes of this phenomenon and help in designing a conceptual framework of analysis for the study.
2. Undertake a field survey to collect relevant primary data from relevant stakeholders including pastoralists communities, actors working with them including government, NGOs, and development partners. Other secondary data from the national statistics, and other sources could also be used.
3.Examine and analyze the data and information on its effects on social, economic and political fronts.
4.Identify and estimate all direct and indirect social, economic and political costs of livestock/cattle rustling and develop with and without control scenarios.
5.Provide policy implications and recommendations for all actors involved in livestock/cattle rustling based on the findings from this study.

PROPOSED METHODOLOGY

To offer good response and insights about livestock/cattle rustling in Kenya, which will guide the other intended regional in-depth study, the methodology of this study will be guided by the following steps:

– Depending on a desk review and secondary forms of data, the study will try to explore the historical context of livestock/cattle rustling and what factors that fuels it. Hot spots near the borders and other levels could also be reviewed.

– The desk review will depend mainly on available published and grey literature and reports from organizations that work on livestock/cattle rustling interventions.

– Depending on primary data, the social, economic and political costs of livestock/cattle rustling will be estimated to justify to what extent that this issue is urgently need viable interventions and mechanisms for its eradication.

– Depending on primary and secondary sources of data the study is expected to estimate the social and economic gains and/or losses to the household

– The sources of primary data will depend on records of live cases of raiding happened during specific period in some selected areas of the country. However, other tools of data collection will be used such as interviews with some government officials form security Departments, key informants interviews, group discussions, observation and other participatory tools

 DELIVERABLES

  1. An inception report with details on the method and tools to be used and the work plan.
  2. Draft report on the assessment of social and economic costs of livestock/cattle rustling in Kenya
  3. A comprehensive final report on the assessment of social and economic costs of livestock/cattle rustling in Kenya

DURATION AND CONDITION OF CONSULTANCY

The total duration of the consultancy will be 60 working days, starting from signing the contract by all parties.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ICPALD
a) Air tickets and Daily Subsistence Allowance (DSA) will be covered for field work outside the duty station upon approval of travel schedules.
b) Liaison and assistance in communicating with stakeholders.
c) Reports will be submitted to Dr. Osman Babikir, Head, Social Economics and Policy, IGAD Centre for Pastoral Area and Livestock Development (ICPALD) Jadala Place, 1st Floor, Ngong Lane, P. O. Box 47824-00100, Nairobi, Kenya, osman.babikir@igad.int 

CONSULTANT QUALIFICATION AND EXPERTISE

  • The successful candidates shall have an advanced degree in livestock economics, animal health and production, conflict and security, agricultural economics or the equivalent
  • Knowledge and experience of using participatory approaches
  • Strong analytical skills
  • Excellent communication/ writing skills and fluency in English

 General professional experience

  • A proven successful track record in livestock economics and/or agricultural economics
  • Proven experience in the required field.
  • Proven knowledge and experience on similar assignments
  • Experience in conducting and facilitating dialogue with national, regional and international organizations

Specific professional experience

  • At least 10 years work experience in issues related to the scope of this study
  • Good understanding about livestock related issues and policies
  • Knowledge of how to develop different scenarios of cost benefit analysis
  • Demonstrate competence and skills in analytical analysis
  • Good reporting writing skills.
  • Strong understanding of the local context is an added advantage

APPLICATIONS

Interested candidates should submit their applications accompanied by a detailed CV, copies of both academic and professional certificates and testimonials, names and addresses of three reputable referees, contact details (e-mail, telephone) should be sent by email to: rose.tsuma@igad.int; with copies to, beverlyne.nyanchera@igad.int, and osman.babikir@igad.int

All applications should be received not later than September 8th, 2017

 

REGIONAL INTEGRATION SUPPORT PROGRAMME (RISP3)
TERMS OF REFERENCE
CONSULTANCY TO ASSESS THE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COST OF CATTLE RUSTLING IN UGANDA

 CONTEXT AND RATIONALE:

This 3rd Regional Integration Support Programme RISP3 is a follow-up phase to RISP1 (2005-2010) and RISP2 (2010 – 2013). The support will be in line with the EU development policies, as stated in the “European Consensus on Development” (2005), “Agenda for Change” (2011), the EU Aid for Trade Strategy (2007), the Joint Africa-EU Strategy (2007) and its Action Plans, especially their provisions regarding regional integration, world markets and the link between trade and development.

The expected results from the activities carried out over the period covered by this programme estimate are: 

Result 1: Support to transposition of regional dryland agriculture and livestock policies at national level within IGAD region.
Result 2: Support to Institutional strengthening of IGAD Secretariat.

Under result area one, the IGAD Centre for Pastoral Areas and Livestock Development (ICPALD) is planning to assess the social and economic cost of cattle rustling in Uganda, among other interventions.

In the past cattle rustling was a traditional coping mechanism used by pastoralists to restock their herds after natural disasters such as drought and animal diseases or to address shortfalls during traditional and/or marriage ceremonies. However, it has over time evolved into a big criminal commercial enterprise leading to increased incidence of violence, conflicts and loss of lives and livestock. The cyclic conflicts within the IGAD region have fueled this practice through the proliferation of small arms which are now used by the pastoralists as means of protection and even spread over the porous boundaries.

Culturally, men marry with cattle as bride prize, however, young men have been incentivized and encouraged to establish their own herds through raiding from other pastoral groups to meet this traditional need. The involvement of youth in this criminal enterprise and the associated deaths and economic waste is the worst part of this tragedy. The practice is documented to have serious negative impacts of economic growth in the region by engaging youth in destructive activities, destroying productive assets, preventing trade, eroding investor confidence and deterring investment by the private sector.

In Uganda and particularly in Karamoja region, which is located at the northeastern part of the country, the practice has characterized the relationship between the Karamojong tribes for generations. In recent years, it has even become violent due, in part, to the proliferation of small arms in the area. In previous years, it was governed by the elders and the traditional leaders, however the traditional mechanisms of leaders and social norms are now eroded leading to new modes of a violent commercialized cattle rustling. To complicate issues the huge and “easy” returns has fueled the adoption of this practice by young people who do that to cater for their own needs. Despite the recent enhancement of security by the government, the practice of cattle rustling continues to take lives of many peoples in the area, undermine livelihoods, negatively affected the level of socio-economic development and the level of private sector investment.

Cattle rustling  is perceived as a major threat to the cattle economy in the pastoral areas and hence there is an urgent need to assist the government at local and national levels to confront this challenge. However, to deal with a challenge, a complementary integrated approach which encompasses efforts of both state and non-state actors is highly needed. It is important that verifiable data and information on the social economic effects of intervening and not intervening to contain the menace. The proposed study is expected to determine the socio-economic effects of cattle rustling at household, District/County and country levels and inform with  evidence the intended and on-going efforts of curbing the cattle rustling practice and hence reducing the crimes associated with it.

OBJECTIVE OF THE CONSULTANCY

The main objective of this assessment is to derive adequate credible evidence to draw sufficient attention at national policy level to the negative social economic impact of livestock/cattle rustling..  The specific objectives of the study are include:-

  • To review the historical context of livestock/cattle rustling and the major factors sustaining the menace.
  • Based on the review above select some hot spots and estimate the social, economic and political costs of livestock/cattle rustling and develop a with and without cattle rustling control scenarios to inform community and policy dialogue while guiding further research and regional planning
  • Propose policy and legal provisions to manage the menace at national and regional levels and link them to the livestock identification and traceability for health and trade
  • To come up with some recommendations and a way forward to help eradicating this practice at household, community and national level.
  • Present the finding for validation by technical teams from IGAD member states at country and regional levels

SPECIFIC TASKS

1. Carry out a desk review to look into the historical and root causes of this phenomenon and help in designing a conceptual framework of analysis for the study
2. Undertake a field survey to collect relevant primary data from relevant stakeholders including pastoralists communities, actors working with them including government, NGOs, and development partners. Other secondary data from the national statistics, and other sources could also be used.
3.Examine and analyze the data and information on its effects on social, economic and political fronts
4.Identify and estimate all direct and indirect social, economic and political costs of livestock/cattle rustling and develop with and without control scenarios
5.Provide policy implications and recommendations for all actors involved in livestock/cattle rustling based on the findings from this study.

PROPOSED METHODOLOGY

To offer good response and insights about livestock/cattle rustling in Uganda, which will guide the other intended regional in-depth study, the methodology of this study will be guided by the following steps:

– Depending on a desk review and secondary forms of data, the study will try to explore the historical context of livestock/cattle rustling and what factors that fuels it. Hot spots near the borders and other levels could also be reviewed.

– The desk review will depend mainly on available published and grey literature and reports from organizations that work on livestock/cattle rustling interventions.

– Depending on primary data, the social, economic and political costs of livestock/cattle rustling will be estimated to justify to what extent that this issue is urgently need viable interventions and mechanisms for its eradication.

– Depending on primary and secondary sources of data the study is expected to estimate the social and economic gains and/or losses to the household

– The sources of primary data will depend on records of live cases of raiding happened during specific period in some selected areas of the country. However, other tools of data collection will be used such as interviews with some government officials form security Departments, key informants interviews, group discussions, observation and other participatory tools

 DELIVERABLES

  1. An inception report with details on the method and tools to be used and the work plan.
  2. Draft report on the assessment of social and economic costs of livestock/cattle rustling in Uganda
  3. A comprehensive final report on the assessment of social and economic costs of livestock/cattle rustling in Uganda

DURATION AND CONDITION OF CONSULTANCY

The total duration of the consultancy will be 60 working days, starting from signing the contract by all parties.

 RESPONSIBILITIES OF ICPALD
a) Air tickets and Daily Subsistence Allowance (DSA) will be covered for field work outside the duty station upon approval of travel schedules.
b) Liaison and assistance in communicating with stakeholders.
c) Reports will be submitted to Dr. Osman Babikir, Head, Social Economics and Policy, IGAD Centre for Pastoral Area and Livestock Development (ICPALD) Jadala Place, 1st Floor, Ngong Lane, P. O. Box 47824-00100, Nairobi, Kenya, osman.babikir@igad.int

 CONSULTANT QUALIFICATION AND EXPERTISE

  • The successful candidates shall have an advanced degree in livestock economics, animal health and production, conflict and security, agricultural economics or the equivalent
  • Knowledge and experience of using participatory approaches
  • Strong analytical skills
  • Excellent communication/ writing skills and fluency in English

 General professional experience

  • A proven successful track record in livestock economics and/or agricultural economics
  • Proven experience in the required field.
  • Proven knowledge and experience on similar assignments
  • Experience in conducting and facilitating dialogue with national, regional and international organizations

Specific professional experience

  • At least 10 years work experience in issues related to the scope of this study
  • Good understanding about livestock related issues and policies
  • Knowledge of how to develop different scenarios of cost benefit analysis
  • Demonstrate competence and skills in analytical analysis
  • Good reporting writing skills.
  • Strong understanding of the local context is an added advantage

APPLICATIONS

Interested candidates should submit their applications accompanied by a detailed CV, copies of both academic and professional certificates and testimonials, names and addresses of three reputable referees, contact details (e-mail, telephone) should be sent by email to: rose.tsuma@igad.int; with copies to, beverlyne.nyanchera@igad.int, and osman.babikir@igad.int

All applications should be received not later than September 8th, 2017

 

 

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EoI)

Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD)

Surveillance of Trade Sensitive Diseases (STSD) Project

Consultancy for the Development of a prototype regional 

Livestock Identification and Traceability System (LITS) generic Database in the IGAD region

Request for EOI No. IGAD/ ICPALD /CF/1/17

1. The Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) has received financing from the European Union (EU) toward the cost of the Surveillance of Trade Sensitive Diseases (STSD) and intends to apply part of the proceeds for this grant to payments under the consultancy for the development of a prototype regional Livestock Identification and Traceability System (LITS) generic database in the IGAD region 

2. The Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) would like to engage the services of a consultant firm to carry out the abovementioned consultancy assignment.

The purpose of the consultancy is to develop a prototype in consultation with LITs stakeholders including national ministries and regional organizations and partners. The specific objectives are: (i) Develop a prototype regional generic database (ii) Present and test the regional generic database (iii) Validate the generic database with IGAD and member states LITs teams

3. The Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) now invites interested and eligible consultant firms to submit Expressions of Interest (EoI) for the above assignment. Detailed Terms of Reference will be shared with shortlisted consultants.

 4. The EOI must include the following information:

i.   Contact details (Physical address, Phone number, fax number, email address);  

ii.   Profile and background of the consultancy firm or consortium,

iii.   Legal documents;

iv.   Certificate of Incorporation

v.   Demonstration of capabilities and experience in successful provision of similar services in the region in the last five years.

vi.  At Least 3 contactable references / referees.

5. Selection procedure shall be in accordance with the African Union (AU) Procurement Manual, version 2.0, July 2016 which is available on AU’s website https://www.au.int.  IGAD is under no obligation to shortlist any consultant who expresses interest. 

6. Interested firms may obtain further information at the address below during office hours from Sunday to Thursday 7:30am to 2:30pm local time, or by email from procurement@igad.int with copies to muchina.munyua@igad.int  

7. Expressions of interest must be delivered (by mail or e-mail) to the address below by 22nd June 2017 on or before 2:00pm Djibouti local time and mention “Consultancy for the development of a prototype regional Livestock Identification and Traceability System (LITS) generic database in the IGAD region 

Att: Mr. Bogale Lemma E-mail:  procurement@igad.int,cc:  muchina.munyua@igad.int 

 

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST
(CONSULTING SERVICES – INDIVIDUAL CONSULTANTS SELECTION)
Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD)
Regional Pastoral Livelihoods Resilience Project

Grant No.:H9190

Assignment Title: Consultancy for Animal Health Reports Proofreading, Editing and Preparation of Policy Briefs 

Reference No.: IGAD/RPLRP/S/17/3

Download ToR Here

How to apply
Expressions of interest must be delivered in a written form to the address below (in person, or by mail, or by e-mail) by June 15th 2017

Regional Pastoral Livelihoods Resilience Project
IGAD Center for Pastoral Areas and Livestock Development (ICPALD)
1st Floor Jadala Place – Ngong Lane, Off Ngong Road
P.O. Box 47824_00100, Nairobi, Kenya
Tel +254 20 2573743
E-mail: rose.tsuma@igad.int , cc: dereje.wakjira@igad.int